Quest in High School

Personalized Learning Through Quest

Find out more about Quest here

Quest Courses in 2020-21

Click the course names to view the course descriptions.

Course Descriptions

English: Research and Composition

ID: 48525 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: English
Prerequisite: None

In order to receive credit in English Research & Composition, students must meet the following requirements: research using credible sources, dynamic oral communication, engaging digital communication, and well-composed written essays. For the student-driven project, the students will develop an informed research question, then gather and analyze scholarly journals, as well as complete a statistical analysis of their own data. Their research will culminate in the writing of a thesis paper, thesis talk, and defense. Throughout the units, the students will deliver multiple presentations that consider how style, content, and the advanced use of technology contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of a text (e.g. making documentaries, digital portfolios, websites, crafting arguments that rely on rhetoric to influence an audience). At the end of the year, students will be able to communicate effectively in various formats while being mindful of audience and purpose.

AT Research

ID: 48526 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: English
Prerequisite: Semester I grade of A or higher in tenth or eleventh grade English course; or current English teacher recommendation.
Note: Quest students who completed AP Seminar and earned a score of 3 or better on the exam may choose to submit the thesis papers they produce in this course to the College Board for AP Research exam scoring. These students will be supported within Quest to follow the AP Research guidelines. To earn the AP Capstone Diploma, students must earn scores of 3 or higher on the AP Seminar and AP Research exams and on four additional AP exams. The Advanced Topic (AT) designation indicates a course is at the university level, putting it at or above the level of a traditional Advanced Placement (AP) course. This course has an additional grade point weighting of 0.5.

Please see above for a detailed description of English: Research & Composition. Students wishing to earn Advanced Topic credit in English: Research & Composition will practice narrative, oral communication, digital communication, and argumentative skills at a level that demonstrates the in-depth application of these skills. Students will complete one additional project per unit. These projects may be self-selected, but may also be suggested by the advisors.

Math: Data Analytics and Visualization

ID: 48534 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: Math
Prerequisite: Completion of Geometry; or recommendation of Quest advisor.

In order to receive credit in Math: Data Analysis & Visualization, students are required to demonstrate their learning in interpreting categorical and quantitative data, making inferences, justifying conclusions, and using probability to make decisions. The focus of the course is on deeply understanding the core concepts of statistical analysis and interpreting data. Students will collect, organize, represent, analyze, and visualize data through the use of statistical software such as Tableau and programming language such as R.

AT Math: Data Analytics and Visualization

ID: 48535 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: Math
Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2/Trig or higher-level math course with Semester I grade of B or higher; or recommendation of Quest advisor.
Note: The Advanced Topic (AT) designation indicates a course is at the university level, putting it at or above the level of a traditional Advanced Placement (AP) course. This course has a grade point weighting of 0.5.

Please see above for a detailed description of Math: Data Analysis & Visualization. Students who wish to earn Advanced Topic credit will individually be held to a higher standard of skill acquisition and will need to demonstrate a high level of data processing and analysis skills. Students are required to collect, organize, represent, analyze, and visualize their own data through the use of statistical software such as Tableau and programming language such as R. Students will work in partnership with the Quest advisors to also definite their own advanced learning objectives and how they personally go beyond the requirements of the college preparatory level in order to attain Advanced Topic credit. Students can elect to prepare to take the AP Statistics exam for credit reported on the transcript.

Science: Conservation and Resource Studies

ID: 48536 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: Science
Prerequisite: Completion of a chemistry course; or current science teacher recommendation.

Through an interdisciplinary lens, students will explore environmental issues and areas of interaction among natural resources, population, energy, technology, societal institutions, and cultural values. Students will draw on course concepts, skills, and community resources in the development of personalized projects. The course is oriented toward understanding the structure and dynamic functions of complex environmental systems within our society and the biosphere. Beyond fundamental concepts of ecology, students will study, analyze and evaluate a range of environmental issues both natural and humanmade, through the lenses of science, technology, and society. Students will be challenged to examine solutions for resolving and/or preventing environmental problems. Ecology investigations will include fieldwork in regional Southeast Asia ecosystems and human-impacted systems such as plantation agriculture and urban systems.

AT Science: Conservation and Resource Studies

ID: 48537 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: Science
Prerequisite: Completion of a chemistry course with grade of B or higher; or completion of a physics course with grade of B or higher; or current science teacher recommendation.
Note: The Advanced Topic (AT) designation indicates a course is at the university level, putting it at or above the level of a traditional Advanced Placement (AP) course. This course has a grade point weighting of 0.5.

Please see above for a detailed description of Science: Conservation & Resource Studies. AT level students will be required to go above and beyond the college preparatory conservation and resource studies course requirements and demonstrate a higher level of rigor throughout the investigative process, experiential fieldwork, field journaling, application, and reflection that occur over the course of the year.

Social Studies: Society, Governance, and Civic Action

ID: 48538 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: Social Studies
Prerequisite: Completion of one year of social studies.

Students will delve into the characteristics and complexities of organizing societies and what it means to ‘govern’. Students will understand the role, responsibility, and limitations of citizens in maintaining, supporting, challenging, and changing how we effectively manage contemporary issues through civic engagement, and the interplay between industry, civil society, and government. Quest students will co-create meaningful, authentic learning tasks that deepen their understanding of the role of citizens, examine their own worldviews and notions of governance, and broaden their perspectives of what it means to participate in society. Governance and the role industry and civil society play will be further examined through student-selected work and volunteer experiences off-campus. Students will present their work in authentic ways intended for public forum and discourse.

AT Social Studies: Society, Governance, and Civic Action

ID: 48539 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: Social Studies
Prerequisite: Semester I grade of B or higher in 10th or 11th-grade Social Studies course; or current/prior Social Studies teacher recommendation.
Note: The Advanced Topic (AT) designation indicates a course is at the university level, putting it at or above the level of a traditional Advanced Placement (AP) course. This course has a grade point weighting of 0.5.

Please see above for a detailed description of Social Studies: Society, Governance, and Civic Action. Students who wish to earn Advanced Topic credit will individually be held to a higher standard of skill acquisition and will need to demonstrate a high level of communication and analysis skills. Students will practice independent research skills to collect, organize, represent, and analyze their own ideas at a level that demonstrates the in-depth application of these skills. Students will complete projects that may be self-selected, but may also be suggested by the advisors.

Systems Thinking and Global Development

ID: 48540 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: Elective
Prerequisite: None

Systems thinking provides ideas that can help students see the world in new ways and the tools to help students take new systemic and effective actions. Systems thinking embodies the idea that the interrelationships among parts relative to a common purpose of a system is what is important. Systems thinking can be thought of as a language. As a language, it is a specific way to look at the world. By “conversing” in the language of feedback loops, students can learn to better articulate the complex interconnections of circular causality in which we live. Learning the language of systems thinking requires students to understand our world on at least four levels - events, the pattern of events, systemic structure and shared vision. Students are required to demonstrate their learning by explaining systems issues in regards to global development, selecting and using the information to investigate a system, thoroughly analyzing context and assumptions, and create a logical conclusion based on the evidence and perspectives discussed.

Ethics and Leadership

ID: 48541 Grade: 11-12 Length: Year
Credit: Elective
Prerequisite: None

This course requires students to use inquiry to examine ethical frameworks of leadership in diverse systems and in different contexts. Students will explore leadership and power and what it means to be a “good” leader. Students will examine the moral responsibility and accountability for ethical leadership and how leadership impacts organizational well-being, health, productivity and cohesion. Students will build an understanding of the role of trust in sustaining human interaction. Students will also examine breakdowns in trust and institutional corruption and its causes. In addition to studying theories and case studies, students will apply what they are learning in areas of their daily life. Students will practice cultural curiosity and the commitment to basic equality of all people while demonstrating humility, respect, reciprocity and integrity. The course will provide opportunities to appreciate the potential of every person regardless of socioeconomic circumstances or cultural origin.