AP Spanish Language and Culture

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is designed to be comparable to fourth semester (or the equivalent) university courses in Spanish.

What are the major projects you will complete in this course?

The AP course prepares students to demonstrate their level of Spanish proficiency with a higher degree of accuracy and fluency across the three communicative modes: spoken and written interpersonal communication; audio, visual and audiovisual interpretive communication; and spoken and written presentational communication. 

Advanced Placement exam is available for this course.

Advanced Placement (AP) exams are available for this course. For more information on Advanced Placement, click here

Course Details

Jose Mejia


"You should take this course if you are willing to hone your ability to comprehend and communicate in formal and informal contexts reflective of the richness of Hispanic language and cultures."

AP Spanish Language and Culture

ID: 45024 Grade: 10-12 Length: Year
Credit: Language
Prerequisite: Current teacher recommendation.
Note: Beginning in 2019-20, eleventh grade students who have completed at least one year in the Intermediate High course will be able to select this course for twelfth grade without a teacher recommendation. Students in ninth and tenth grades will still require a teacher recommendation. This course has a grade point weighting of 0.5.

This AP course is comparable to a fourth semester college course in Spanish. The course prepares students to demonstrate their level of Spanish proficiency with a higher degree of accuracy and fluency across the three communicative modes: spoken and written interpersonal communication; audio, visual and audiovisual interpretive communication; and spoken and written presentational communication. Students will also hone their ability to comprehend and communicate in formal and informal contexts reflective of the richness of Hispanic language and cultures. Instructional materials and activities are carefully and strategically adapted from authentic sources to support the linguistic and cultural goals of the course. Students will be prepared for and strongly encouraged to sit for the AP exam in May.

What Our Students Say

 


One of the most important aspects of AP Spanish is that it often feels more like a class in Spanish than a class where Spanish is being taught. Students who are interested in current events and investigating real world problems (in Spanish of course) will enjoy the class. The focus on history and culture also makes the course quite challenging, as it often requires domain-specific vocabulary and background knowledge on the assessments. Due to this, the advice that I have for any student considering the course is to be prepared to research and familiarize yourself with a wide variety of vocabulary and topics (politics, climate change, history) as homework in order to do well in the course. ”
Maya Shah McDaniel,
Class of 2021

 


I believe a student should sign up for AP Spanish if they are passionate about the Spanish language and if they know they will put in sufficient effort to succeed in the class. The most effective way to be successful in AP Spanish is through dedication, motivation and practice. New vocabulary and concepts in foreign languages don't come easily to everyone, which is why the best you can do is consistently practice reading, listening, and writing skills. What I love most about AP Spanish is the interaction and amount of communication there is between the students and the teacher. I strongly believe languages are best learned through speaking, and in AP Spanish we have discussions on a wide range of interesting topics in every class.”
Sofia Smirnova,
Class of 2020

Results that Matter

20+

Advanced Placement (AP) courses and exams

97%

of 3's, 4's, and 5's received in AP exams in 2018

21

Advanced Topics (AT) courses

34%

of the Class of 2018 graduates were awarded cum laude commendations

What Our Alumni Say

Testimonial

Without a doubt, AP Spanish is the class that most represents what many small, lecture-based college courses look like. In fact, in my first-year Spanish class, I used the same online textbook site as in high school. In college, however, the language classes are much more memorization-heavy, testing on thick lists of vocabulary and obscure grammatical concepts. I highly recommend taking AP Spanish at SAS as a chance to learn something about the culture of the language before being bombarded by three semesters of subjunctive.

Louis Gordon, Class of 2018